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English 3

Week of April 27th

One Act Play Continued

Students were instructed to expand the list of the characters in their one-act play to include their personality traits, character, etc.

Students were told that a group of investors were interested in investing in their one act plays.  Students were put in groups to discuss their one act plays, students rated each play, and decided which play had the best potential and presented their decisions to the investors.

Students read and analyze the Review: ‘Nirbhaya,’ a Lamentation and a Rallying Cry for Indian Women, link below


 

Week of April 20th

Introduction of the next project - One Act Play

Students explored the following website:  Guthrie Theater

Students were instructed to read the NPR report of the play, Mr. Burns, link below.

web_showpagebanner_MrBurns.jpg
 

Student were instructed to read Jennifer Crossley Howard's article, "Where a Literary Favorite Is a Guaranteed Stage Hit."

Students were instructed to read a one-act play.

Students were instructed to choose two poignant moments from the novel of this year's Novel Project.

Students were instructed to write a synopsis for a one-act play of one of the two events that you chose from your novel.

Students were instructed to make a list of the characters in their one-act play.

Students were instructed to make a list of the props for their one-act play.

Week of April 13th

HHS Thematic Text Set Presentation Project

 

 

The ultimate three minute presentation site (3MRP)

What is the 3 Minute Research Presentation?

 

A research symposium—needs restructuring for our purposes

University Research Symposium to showcase student work April 10

 

Oakland Book Festival One Day • Seven Hours - 90 Writers • 40 Events

 

GUIDELINES FOR POSTER PRESENTATIONS ...

 

University of California, Santa Barbara

Body of the Poster/Exhibit: Guidelines for Poster Presentations”

 

Poster Event.jpg
 

 

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UucWv5tVnUM&feature=youtu.be

an animate video

How to make a research presentation

clgiles.ist.psu.edu/research-presentation/ResearchPresentation.ppt

Give the audience a sense of what your idea/work is; Make them want to read your paper; Get ...

This page contains too many words for a presentation slide.

http://clgiles.ist.psu.edu/research-presentation/ResearchPresentation.ppt

Excellent PowerPoint of general and specific tips for a research presentation, but it can be

adapted for any purpose by a person with an adequate degree of mental agility

NPR’s Science Friday Videos:

http://www.sciencefriday.com/video/11/09/2012/desktop-diaries-oliver-sacks.html

4:23? Odd but offers potential for adapting to suit students’ purposes for our thematic text set project

Week of March 22nd

Updated Project Instructions

English 3P/Honors 3P

Text Set Project: March 2015

You and your group members will create a text set of literature, fiction and nonfiction, that reflects various views, perspectives, and slants related to the theme assigned to you: “’Conception of Freedom,’ ‘New Definition of Morality,’ ‘Idea of Justice,’ or ‘Renewal of the Human Spirit’” (Park).

Your text set will consist of published texts and texts crafted by you and your group members. You want to strive to include a variety of genres and mediums, such as poems, short stories, literary reviews, newspaper, magazine, and journal articles and essays, interview transcripts, manifestos, open letters, documentary reviews, plays, children’s stories, etc.

Twelve total texts required: Seven (or six for groups with four members) by outside authors, one by each group member, a prologue, and an epilogue--

A surprise element or component--

A print and online version of your group’s anthology is required.

 

Additional requirements:

Record your time on task, in class and outside of class;

Keep all related work (annotated texts, notes, ideas);

Write two project journal entries per week (reflections on the progress of project and your discoveries during the project);

A labeled version (in addition to the version w/in the anthology) of your text (label elements of the genre, stylistic features, and provide the background information that explains how your text relates to the thematic focus of the overall project);

Bring work-in-progress to class each day; and

Make up work due to absences.

 

 

Due date: March 27, 2015

Points possible: 300


Additional Requirements:

Provide a prologue and an epilogue (or a forward and afterword).

Each should address the intent of the collection. These will allow me to understand what each text contributes to the overall aim of the anthology. These may be co-authored.

Those charged with composing these might be group members who put in less time than others on the research and composing (of the individually crafted text).

To prepare yourself for this requirement, each person in the group needs to read two prologue and an epilogue (or a forward and afterword).

Ask yourself, “How will this preface help to solve the problem of explaining the intention of our anthology to the reader?” Because our intention is to provide the reader with a multitude of statements, opinions, beliefs, or views related to our assigned theme, we somehow need to address that in the forward and afterword (or prologue and epilogue or preamble and coda).

We need to contextualize each text in relation to our intention to convey various statements, opinions, beliefs, and views related to an assigned theme.

Model these on the “Background” information rectangles that precede each text in our textbook and/or the model in the pink sheet prior to book excerpts.

I do not want the anthology to look like a classroom assignment.

It’s possible that the prologue and epilogue will accomplish that purpose. Think about the nature of the editorials of the pink sheet of the San Francisco Chronicle and the “Preamble” and “Coda” within Orion.


 

Rubric

Anthology: Thematic Text Set

Group Assessment

Twelve Texts: ________    (How many different genres? ____)              

Prologue: ____                                                                                                

Epilogue: ____                                                                                                

Student-authored texts:      /3   or     /4                                     

Published texts:      /7   or     /8                                                 

Background texts:      /10                                                          

Surprise element:     /1                                                             

Aesthetic appeal of cover: 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  0                        

Aesthetic appeal of collection: 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  0                

                         (challenge, originality, functionality)

Overall analysis:

                           originality: 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  0

                           challenge: 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  0

                           concentration on and scope of theme: 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  0

                           degree of mastery of mechanics: 10  9  8  7  6  5  4  3  2  1  0

 

Group members’ names:


 

Theme:

 

Date range:

Period:

Total score: ____________________


 

Anthology: Thematic Text Set

Individual Assessment

How many texts did you author?     /1

Did you label a version of your text(s)?   Yes    No

Provide the following information for each text that you authored:

Genre:

Title:

Background context? Yes    No

                                                                                                                       /60

Describe your contribution to the prologue and/or epilogue.

 

How many texts did you locate for the text set?   ______

Provide the following information for each text that you located for the text set:

Genre:

Title:

Thematic claim:

Background context? Yes    No

 

Genre:

Title:

Thematic claim:

Background context? Yes    No

 

Genre:

Title:

Thematic claim:

Background context? Yes    No

 

Genre:

Title:

Thematic claim:

Background context? Yes    No

 

Describe your role in helping to actualize the surprise element.


 

Use the space below to describe or explain any additional information that you want me to consider related to your involvement in and the production of the thematic text set anthology.





 

Anthology: Thematic Text Set

Basic Point Allocation
 

Individual Work:

Journal Entries: eight entries 80 pts

Homework: eight to ten hours 80 pts

Individual text—labeled: 60 pts

                                                                  Sub-total: 220                                Average (based on quality):

Collective Anthology (text set):

Aesthetic Appeal of the anthology: 1 pts

Prologue: 1 pts

Texts (12): 36 pts

Backgrounds (10): 20 pts

Surprise element: 1 pt

Epilogue: 1 pt

                                                                  Sub-total: 60      Quantity:

                                                                                                Quality:                 

                                                                    Average (based on quantity and quality):

Presentation:

Presentation: 20 pts

                                                                   Sub-total: 20                                    Average (based on quality):




                                                                      Total: 300

Week of March 2nd

Text Set Project: March 2015, due March 27, 2015

You and your group members will create a text set of literature, fiction and nonfiction, that reflects various views, perspectives, and slants related to the theme assigned to you: “’Conception of Freedom,’ ‘New Definition of Morality,’ ‘Idea of Justice,’ or ‘Renewal of the Human Spirit’” (Park).

Your text set will consist of published texts and texts crafted by you and your group members. You want to strive to include a variety of genres and mediums, such as poems, short stories, literary reviews, newspaper, magazine, and journal articles and essays, interview transcripts, manifestos, open letters, documentary reviews, children’s stories, etc.

Ten total texts required: Seven (or six for groups with four members) by outside authors and one by each group member

A print and online version of your group’s anthology is required.

Additional requirements:

Record your time on task, in class and outside of class; Keep all related work; Bring work-in-progress to class each day; and Make up work due to absences.

Due date: March 27, 2015

Points possible: 300

Week of Feb 23rd

Students worked on their submission to the Writing Festival, due Friday, 2/27/15.

Students practiced taking the California SBAC

Week of Feb 17th

 

Students continued working on their short story assignment, the due date was extended, final draft due 2/19/15.  Students were reminded to reread their story every night and make changes and additions as necessary.

Students were asked to write a 500 - 750 word short story (fiction).  A strong draft was due Thursday, 2/12/15. 

The story must convey a theme, it must be unified, and written for a young adult audience. Work on this story 20 minutes every night, Font size must be 12-14, use a font type that is easy to read, provide a word count.  Once you have completed your story, analyze, label the elements of the short story, and identify the theme.  


Students used the computers to find an interview with author, Tim O'Brien, students were asked to listen to the interview and take notes as necessary. 

Students listened to the audio, Ambush, by Tim O'Brien--and took notes as necessary.


Students watched a video clip, Two Roads with Ed Bearden and Richard Anderson

Week of Feb 9th

Students were asked to read pages 744-745, take notes as needed. 

Note that theme is the Literary Analysis on page 745, Theme is the central message communicated by a literary work.  It may not be explicit but often  emerges as a set of ideas expressed through literary elements. 

The answers to certain questions can help you identify a story's theme. 

1) What is the resolution of the primary conflict?

2) What traits do the main characters display?

3) What about the physical or cultural setting is significant?

4) What point of view is used to describe the experiences of the main character? 

5) What objects or figures have symbolic meaning? 

6) What does the title refer to?


Mrs. Mitchell Lectured briefly on the categories of theme:

Categories of theme: Innocence and experience, conformity and rebellion, love and hate, the presence of death.

Consider the following categories of theme and related book titles:

1) Conformity and Rebellion - "The Man Who Lived Underground" and "In Darkness and Confusion"

2) Love and Hate, "Going To Meet The Man"  and "Theater," 

3) The Presence of Death - "Idiots First" and "The Jilting of Granny Weatherall." 

 


Students were asked to make a listing of some of the short stories and/or novels that they have read since 7th grade, then identify the themes of the same.


Students were asked to write a 500 word short story (fiction).  A strong draft is due Thursday, 2/12/15. 

The story must convey a theme, it must be unified, and written for a young adult audience. Work on this story 20 minutes every night, Font size must be 12-14, use a font type that is easy to read, provide a word count.  Once you have completed your story, analyze, label the elements of the short story, and identify the theme.  


Students were asked to read the following articles from Writer's Digest,

How to Develop Any Idea Into a Great Story, by Elizabeth Sims.

4 WAYS TO MOTIVATE CHARACTERS AND PLOT, by Nancy Kress

 

Week of Feb 3rd

Students were asked to complete the following tasks:

Read and take notes as needed, pages 623-627 in the text.

Read and take notes as needed, Late Nineteenth Century and Naturalism, due Friday, (02/06/15)

Students watched a video clip, Brian Williams' apology leaves out key details of Iraq incident

Week of January 27th

Students watched a video clip, "A Comedian's View on Postmodernism"


Students were asked to complete the following tasks:

Read and take notes as needed: Page 506-507

Form and Content in Poetry

Do you think everything has already been said?  Throughout American history, poets have prided themselves on finding new ways to say things, as well as inventing new poetic forms in which to say them.

Form and Function

All works of art have form, a particular organization of parts that makes a whole.  In poetry, form is referred to as poetic structure: the way words are arranged in lines, lines are arranged in stanzas, and units of sound are organized to achieve rhythm and rhyme.  In general, poetic forms fall into two categories, traditional and organic.  Poems in traditional form follow certain fixed rules. For example, they can have a limited number of lines, a specified meter and rhyme scheme, and a definite structure.  Such poems are also called fixed form poems and include the sonnet, the ballad, the epic, the elegy, the ode, the villanelle, and blank verse.  Often, poets choose a form that fits the subject matter.  For example, a sonnet was originally intended only for the subject of love. The great English poets, such as William Shakespeare and John Milton, used traditional poetic forms, as did many early American poets.

The organic form of poetry, also known as irregular form, developed in the early 19th century.  The English romantic poets wanted more flexible verse forms to fit the new content of their poetry.  Unlike traditional forms, which provide an ideal pattern for poems to follow, organic form takes its shape and pattern from the content of the poem itself.  That is, the form of a poem "grows" naturally out of what a poem says.  A poem in organic form may have meter and rhyme, but the poet may vary the rhythm and rhyme scheme in irregular and unexpected ways.  In searching for way to find new expression, several American poets,  such as Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson, began experimenting with organic form.

Poetic Form in Action

One way to understand the difference between traditional and organic forms is to compare the poetry of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow and Emily Dickinson.  Longfellow was somewhat conventional in most of his poems, using a predictable alternating rhyme scheme and punctuation.  The excerpted lines shown on page 507 from the "Psalm of Life" have a regular meter (even the dash in the second line counts as an unstressed syllable).

Now look at the first stanza of a poem by Dickinson on page 507.  She also used meter and rhyme, but she added rhythmical variations, which characterize it as organic.  The first line has four accents plus an unaccented dash, while the next three lines each has three accented syllables and is an enjambed, or run-on, line--- a line that ends without a grammatical or normal speech pause.

Free verse is an organic form that lacks regular meter and rhyme.  Although free verse still has rhythm and may include an occasional rhyme within a line, it does not follow any strict rules.  Like all forms of poetry, however it may include a variety of sound devices, such as repetition and alliteration, to achieve a musical quality.

The great master of free verse in American poetry was Walt Whitman.  At a time when American poetry followed traditional forms, Whitman went his own way and created a form that grew purely out of the ideas expressed.  In the passage--on page 507-- "I Hear America Singing," notice the language and sound devices that create a poetic effect in sentences that are almost like those in prose.


Read and take notes as needed: page 508-509, page 524-525 in the text book.


Read, analyze, and interpret "I Hear America Singing" (p510) and respond to questions 1, 2, and 3 at the bottom of page 510.  Be sure that your analysis includes your thoughts about what the literary devices contribute to the effect and meaning of the poem.  Also, be prepared to explain the realism-ishness of this poem.


Read, analyze, and interpret "Much Madness is divinest Sense---" (p529).  Analyze and interpret the poem.  Be sure that your analysis includes your thoughts about what Dickinson's stylistic choices contribute to the effect and meaning of the poem.  Also, be prepared to explain the realism-ishness of this poem.


After reading and analyzing the above, students were asked to write a parody of either "Much Madness is divinest Sense," or "I Hear America Singing," due Thursday, (02/05/15)

Week of January 20th

Students read a poem from the text, page 1156, Ballad of Birmingham, Dudley Randall

"Mother dear, may I go downtown instead of out to play, and march the streets of Birmingham in a freedom march today?" "No baby, no, you may not go, for the dogs are fierce and wild, and clubs and hoses, guns and jails ain't good for a little child."  "But, mother, I won't be alone.  Other children will go with me, and march the streets of Birmingham to make our country free."  "No, baby, no, you may not go, for I fear those guns will fire.  But you may go to church instead, and sing in the children's choir."  She has combed and brushed her nightdark hair, and bathed rose petal sweet, and drawn white gloves on her small brown hands, and white shoes on her feet.  The mother smiled to know her child was in the sacred place, but that smile was the last smile to come upon her face.  For when she heard the explosion, her eyes grew wet and wild.  She raced through the streets of Birmingham calling for her child.  She clawed through bits of glass and brick, then lifted out a shoe.  "O, here's the shoe my baby wore, but, baby, where are you?"


Students read a poem from the text, page 560, Free Labor, Frances Ellen Watkins Harper

I wear an easy garment, O'er it no toiling slave  Wept tears of hopeless anguish, In his passage to the grave.  And from its ample folds Shall rise no cry to God, Upon its warp and woof shall be No stain of tears and blood.  Oh, lightly shall it press my form, Unladened with a sigh, I shall not 'mid its rustling hear, Some sad despairing cry. This fabric is too light to bear The weight of bondsmen's tears, I shall not in its texture trace The agony of years. Too light to bear a smother'd sigh, From some lorn woman's heart, Whose only wreath of household love Is rudely torn apart. Then lightly shall it press my form,  Unburden'd by a sigh; And from its seams and folds shall rise, No voice to pierce the sky, And witness at the throne of God, In language deep and strong, That I have nerv'd Oppression's hand, For deeds of guilt and wrong.


Students were asked to draft a poem that weighs in on a social issue that interests or concerns you.  The speaker must represent a realist perspective and you must employ realist techniques.  Identify and explain each principle and technique of realism that you embed in your poem.


Students read and took notes on the articles below.

A simple guide to Post Modernism

Approaches to Po-Mo Page: Postmodern to Post-postmodern

Week of January 12th

Literature of the Civil War

Realism and Postmodernism

Students were asked to create a t-chart with Realism on the right and Postmodernism on the left, under each heading students were to produce a list of the characteristics for each.

Read Page 501, in your text.  Personal experience was central to the literature of the time, because everyday life now had great historical significance  Writers--male and female, white and black, from the highest ranking general down to the common foot soldier--shared "their" Civil War in diaries and letters.

While these writers addressed their words to friends and family (or even for themselves), others, such as President Abraham Lincoln, wrote for a larger audience.  Still, Lincoln underestimated the reach of his words.  "The world will little note, nor long remember, what we say here," he proclaimed in his Gettysburg Address, which in fact proved to be one of the most enduring works of the civil war era.

Lincoln's speech, with its inspiring message and elevated language, represents the highest ideals of the period.  The fiction created after the war by realistic writers such as Ambrose Bierce and Stephen Crane, however, shows the period in a harsher light.  Their stories focus on the human tragedy of a war that destroyed hundreds of thousands of American lives, even as it freed many more.

In the years to come, realism would grow and refine itself to include the work of writers countrywide, from the frozen Arctic north of Jack London to the plains of Willa Cather's frontier.  It would develop to include the work of naturalist writers who viewed human beings as passive victims of their environment. Brought on by the brutalities of the Civil War, realism would become the form that to some extent still dominates American literature today.

Read page R117, Realism, As a general term, realism refers to any effort to offer an accurate and detailed portrayal of actual life.  Thus, critics talk about Shakespeare's realistic portrayals of his characters and praise the medieval poet Chaucer for his realistic descriptions of people from different social classes.

More specifically, realism refers to a literary method developed in the 19th century.  The realists based their writing on careful observations of contemporary life, often focusing on the middle and lower classes.  They attempted to present life objectively and honestly, without the sentimentality or idealism that had colored earlier literature.  Typically, realists developed their settings in great detail in an effort to recreate a specific time and place for the reader.  Willa Cather, Kate Chopin, and Mark Twain are all considered realists.

Read pages 576-577 in the text.  REALISM.  Most modern readers expect stories to be like real life.  In the mid-19th century, however, a "realistic" story was considered radical and was even criticized.  Despite this outcry, several famous American writers persevered, and in doing so, they initiated one of the most enduring movements in literary history. 

The Rise of Realism, Realism in literature refers to writing that offers an accurate and detailed portrayal of actual life.  It also refers to a literary movement that first developed in France in the mid-19th century and then spread to England, Russia, and the United States.  Realism was born as a reaction to romanticism, an artistic and literary movement that glorified the individual and celebrated the emotions and imagination; it dominated literature during the early 19th century.  Unlike the romantics, realists did not want to glorify anything.  They simply wanted to depict reality, no matter how ordinary the characters or their circumstances.  In basing their literature on careful observations of commonplace events and people, the realists believed they could shed light on greater social issues and concerns.

In the United States, realism was also the product of a rapidly changing society.  By the end of the Civil War in 1865, America was changing from a predominantly rural society to an urban one and was experiencing the effects of the Industrial Revolution.  Many writers were inspired to depict the effects of these dramatic social changes on the average citizen.  The first American writers to experiment with realism--in the 1870s and 1880s--were Mark Twain, William Dean Howells, and Henry James.   In the following decades, the realist movement spawned several related movements, such as naturalism, regionalism, and local color (see pages 632-633).

Characteristics of Realism

COMPLEX CHARACTERS IN ORDINARY PLACES, In realist fiction, character exploration and development became more important than the plot.  Often characters were laborers, businessmen, or housewives from the lower and middle classes.  Exploring details of a personality or a relationship could reveal important complexities, contradictions, and ironies, especially those related to social or economic issues.

The realist writers might write long, involved descriptions of a character's inner thoughts, usually focused on personal concerns of the mundane  events of his or her everyday life.  Realist fiction would typically

  • focus on complex characters who are ordinary people, not heroes or villans
  • portray ordinary settings, especially those that allow for accurate depictions of society and culture
  • depict true-to-life dialogue that captures the dialects and idioms of conversation

DETACHED NARRATION, Realist writers adopted the scientific method of detached observation.  This allows the narrator of a story to sound unbiased and distant, as if simply recording the complete facts of the story.  The reader is then allowed to draw his or her own conclusions.  Notice the detached perspective of the narrator and the detailed description in this passage.

 

 

Week of January 5th

Descriptive Outline for from Danse Macabre, due Friday, 1/9/15

Descriptive Outline for your Final Essay, due Friday, 1/9/15


Monday-Thursday

Students were asked to write a description of the most suspenseful scene of a horror movie or horror movie trailer that they had watched.

Students were asked to write about their response to the outcome of the suspenseful scene.

Students were asked to write a response to the following prompt: What moves will make us careful, accurate, and alert readers and consciously rhetorical writers, writers in control of the content and style of their texts?

Students were asked to read the excerpt in the box below, Descriptive Outlining.

Students were asked to read pages 450 and 451 in their text, (Essay by Steven King) from Danse Macabre, and write a descriptive outline for each paragraph following the format below.

Students were  asked to type their "Final" essay, and write a descriptive outline following the format below;

Paragraph 1

Does:

Says:

Paragraph 2

Does:

Says:

and so on...

.

Descriptive Outlining

Students were asked to read the following excerpt from Reading Rhetorically, by John C. Bean, Virginia A. Chappell, and Alice M. Gillam.

 

A does statement identifies a paragraph's or section's function or purpose within the context of an entire piece, while a says statement summarizes the content of the same stretch of text. 

 

Does statements should not repeat the content but should focus instead on the purpose or function of the content in relation to the overall argument.

 

Sample does statements might be, "offers an anecdote to illustrate previous point," "introduces a new reason in support of main argument," "provides statistical evidence to support the claim," or "summarizes the previous section."

 

Does and says statements help you see how a text works at the micro level, paragraph by paragraph, section by section. 

 

This kind of analysis is particularly useful if you intend to write a summary of the passage, and it is a good way to begin an analysis or critique of an author's rhetorical methods.

 

To illustrate, here are does and says statements for the three opening paragraphs of the Weston selection printed at the end of the chapter:

Paragraph 1

Does: States the problem and illustrates it with dramatic examples.

Says: Severe environmental problems are forcing us to realize that there's something profoundly wrong with our relationship to the natural world.

 

Paragraph 2

Does: Explains and then rejects short-term solutions.

Says: We respond to environmental problems with short-term solutions.

 

Paragraph 3

Does: Introduces his solution

Says: Because practical solutions are only short-term, long-term solutions require new ways of living to reduce pollution.

 

The challenge of applying the technique is separating the "does" from the "says."

 

What a text does is not the same thing as what it says

 

Rather than summarize content, a does statement should indicate a paragraph's function or purpose within an unfolding structure. 

 

Determining what a paragraph does will force you to see how it functions within an organizational design--for example, whether a paragraph introduces a new point or supports a previous one.

 

The resulting analytical distance gives you not only a powerful tool for the rhetorical analysis but also a valuable aid for revision of your own writing.

 

Asking what sections of your text do and say will help you focus on both content and organization when you revise.

 

At first you may find descriptive outlining to be more difficult than you expect, forcing you to reread the article slowly, part by part.  (That's one of this chapter's major points--the need to reread).

 

Soon, however, your puzzlement will evolve into a clearer understanding of the argument and structure of the text you are examining.

 

Trust us!  To assist you in writing does statements, usually the more difficult of the two to write, the box below offers a list of verbs that are useful for describing the rhetorical functions performed by a paragraph or section of the text.

Verbs That Describe What Texts Do

adds, analyzes, argues, asks, cites, compares, connects, continues, contradicts, contrasts, demonstrates, describes, details, dramatizes, elaborates, evaluates, explains, expresses, extends, generalizes, illustrates, informs, interprets, introduces, lists, narrates, offers, opposes, predicts, presents, projects, proposes, qualifies, questions, quotes, reasons, rebuts, reflects, repeats, states, speculates, suggests, summarizes, supports, synthesizes, traces, uses.


 

Unit 1, Early American Writing-Slave Narratives

Class Notes

Week of 9/22/14


Read Pages 536-537.  Take notes as needed

Summarize and analyze the style of the following paragraphs from the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave: paragraph one, pages 538-539 and paragraphs eitht and nine, page 547.

 

Read pages 550-551.  Take notes as needed.

Read Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, pages 552-558.  Respond to the following questions on page 558:: 3, 5, 6, and 10.  Be sure to imbed the question in the response.

 

Read and interpret the poems on pages 560 and 561.  Also, write a half-page response to each.

 

Additional Notes

Unit 1, Historical Narratives- Of Plymouth Plantation Continued

Week of 9/15/14

Students worked in groups to create an illustration of their part of the Chronicle, Of Plymouth Plantation.

 

Students presented their illustrations sharing what they had learned with regard to beliefs, values, and goals of the native people and the Europeans. 

Unit 1, Historical Narratives, La Relacion, Of Pylmouth Plantation

Week of 9/8/14

 

Read pages 68-75, Take notes that show you understand historical context (literary analysis) in general and in relation to "La Relacion." Also, fill out a chart like the one on page 69 to note and emphasize the special insights that this primary source offers.  Due 9/9/14

 

Read pages 88-96.  Take notes that show you understand narrator (literary analysis) in general and in relation to The General History of Virginia.  Also, fill out a chart like the one on page 89.  Also, respond throughly to the following questions on page 96: 5, 6, and 7. Due 9/10/14

 

Read pages 98-99. Take notes that show you understand cultural characteristics (literary focus) in general and in relation to Of Plymouth Plantation.  Students worked in groups on their assigned section of the Chronicle, Of Plymouth Plantation. Due 9/12/14

Unit 1, Early American Writing-Exploration and the Early Settlers

Essential Questions:

What value do the explorers of space and of the ocean provide--to humans, to other species, to various habitats?

Are there ethical issues associated with the explorations?

Create something to publish your response to these questions.

Week of 9/2/14:

Read page 19: Read the "Meeting of Two Worlds" section of "Early American Writing: Historical Context."  Take notes

Read page 21: Read the "Enlightenment" section of "Ideas of the Age."  Take notes of key ideas.

Read pages 23-24: Read the "Exploration and the Early Settlers" section of "Early American Literature."  Take notes of key ideas.

Read pages 66-67.  Take notes as needed.

 

Video of Luca the astronaut with the water in his helmet

http://www.space.com/22485-itilian-astronaut -spacesuit-leak-video.html

 

Podcast of an interview with an astronaut who did some repair on the Hubble

http://astrophysics.gsfc.nasa.gov/outreach/podcast/wordpress/index.php/2009/09/30/podcast-john-grusnfeld-astronaut-and-astronomer/

 

The Star Spot, various podcasts about astrophysics and some space exploration--

http://starspotpodcast.com/2013/05/17/episode-30-hacking-the-future-of-space-exploration-featuring-the-international-space-apps-challenge/

 

The Star Spot, episode #30 podcast about studies being conducted in space by astronauts (May 17,2013)

http://blogs.airspacemag.com/pettit/

 

9/4/14

Group project:  Students worked in groups, they imagined that they are living in 2514.  They come across the three or four primary sources listed above. What would they infer about Americans living in the 21st Century based on watching the historical narratives listed above.  Students applied the strategies listed on page 66 to analyze the historical narratives.  Student recorded specific details to support their responses.

 

 

Unit 1, Early American Writing-The Native Experience:World on the Turtle's Back, Coyote and Buffalo

8/25/14:

Homework due 8/26/14:

Read the background information for your assigned area, (Trickster Tale or Creation Myth) either page 32 or page 42, take notes

Read the Literary Analysis for your assigned area, either page 33 or page 43, take notes

8/26/14: Work in your assigned groups to create a Dramatization Performance of your reading assignment, keep track of who did what.

8/27/14: Students watched a short video clip to learn about story telling strategies.  Students worked in groups on their dramatizations.

8/28/14: Students watched groups present their Dramatization Performances of the Trickster Tale or Creation Myth project.

8/29/14: Students watched groups present their Dramatization Performances of the Trickster Tale or Creation Myth project. 

In-class activity;

Response to Orature:

1. Identify the differences between the dramatization of the Creation Myth or Trickster Tale (whichever you are assigned to) and the version in our text books.

2. Explain the potential consequences of those differences.  Please refer to the details on page 33 or page 43 to guide your response.

3. For those who performed; In two or three sentences, explain how you felt about performing.

 

Week of Feb 23rd

Students worked on their submission to the Writing Festival, due Friday, 2/27/15.

Students practiced taking the California Smarter Balanced Practice and Training Test

Week of March 9 thru March 20

Text Set Project (Thematic Assignment) Instructions, due March 27th

Students explored the Student and Alumni Upstander Scholarship Contest


Homework: Due Thursday, 3/12/15.

Analyze two or more prologues, prefaces, forwards, epilogues, or afterwards.


Classwork:

Read editorials below, add notes, identify the parts and the elements, label the stylistic features.

California should pass “death with dignity” law

A Reckless Call From the Senate’s Leader

No Cause to Delay the Afghan Pullout

Painkiller Abuses and Ignorance

Georgia, Back in the Death-Penalty Spotlight

 

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